12 ways a small house has improved my life



When I moved to the US, I dreamed of living in a large home. Mansions as seen on TV, represented my American dream.

When Scott and I bought our first house, we indulged my aspirations. But after seven years of living large, varied circumstances led us to move into a house half the size. The move presented logistical challenges and I worried about "status", but I was excited about change.

Today, I have completely embraced small living, and could not even envision going back to big (I actually dream of smaller).

I have come to learn that bigger is not necessarily better.

Here are areas that I have found our small house has improved:
  1. Family bonds: We brush our teeth together, eat together, watch movies together, and even bump into each other ;), which sometimes turns into a wrestle (my fave).
  2. Housekeeping efficiency: Five minutes to pick up, two hours to deep clean. Cleaning used to take all day, now it takes a morning.
  3. Home maintenance cost: Although everything gets used more, there is less in quantity to break, and therefore less to repair. We can also easily stay on top of repairs.
  4. Community exchange: We reach out to friends or community for seldomly used items. Today I sent out an email for a pair of hiking boots size 6, by the end of the day, I had located two pairs (Thanks Tina and Mary!)
  5. Utilities cost: A smaller house is evidently cheaper to heat and light, but also cheaper to retrofit (e.g., insulation, windows, and solar).
  6. Space optimization: We use all the available space. I used to have a guest bedroom in my previous home. It required year round cleaning and heating, for only a couple of uses per year. Today, we simply offer the kids' bedroom to guests, and the kids get excited about camping in their playroom!
  7. Home security: I definitely feel safer in a small home. I know every nook and cranny of the house. A monster cannot hide in the closet:)
  8. Ecological impact: It makes Zero Waste manageable. "Less space, less stuff, less waste", Leo once said.
  9. Residency options: For us, downsizing has afforded a spot within walking distance of great schools and an active downtown - after we were told that there was no availability in our price range.
  10. Parental awareness: We used intercoms (baby monitors) in the old house. Now we can hear each other sneeze across the house. We might have to move when the kids become sexually active;)
  11. Health: For two reasons...1) A smaller space is easier to clean, which means that dust does not linger in hard to reach places; and, 2) A small house encourages outdoor activity - in the summer, my deck becomes my office.
  12. Stuff management: Stuff has been easier to manage in a small home for 3 reasons
  • Consumption: Small spaces control the amount of stuff coming into the house. In my old house, I bought furniture just to fill large rooms. Now, we focus on double duty and functional items.
  • Organization (once you have decluttered): It's easy to put things away, easy to find things.
  • Access: It's even easy to get to things (closer distances).
When I asked the kids, what their thoughts were on living in a small house... Max replied: "You can't play hide-and-seek." That's one drawback that doesn't seem to bother him though, because he is already talking about building his own tiny house someday.

And that would make One Proud Mama.

125 comments:

  1. I agree! I live in 800 square feet with my husband and two kids (no basement, no garage)--but a huge backyard!--and it's helped me control how much "stuff" we own better than anything else.

    I also wanted to share that today I went to the food co-op in my town and for the first time, brought some clean wide-mouth glass jars with me. Imagine my surprise when they refused to fill my jar with pasta salad at the deli counter, saying they could only give me one of their flimsy plastic throwaway containers! However, at the Hy-Vee (mainstream supermarket) they looked at me like I had two heads, but did put the pasta salad I asked for in my jar. At the meat counter, they were totally cool about putting my lunchmeat in my own jar. Haha!

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    1. Congrats Anne! And no worries... your confidence will build up overtime and soon your extra head will disappear ;)

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    2. Anonymous2/18/2012

      Also Anne,
      I started doing the "take your own containers" thing about four months ago. We have three supermarkets within easy access of home - initially I struck problems with all three, but after I reassured them that I wouldn't claim against them if we all fell ill after eating their food (packed in my containers), two of them settled right down. Needless to say, these are the two I use; but if I haven't brought sufficient containers, then I don't buy whatever it is I want - I suspect they would think I was just playing at it, and turn difficult. Certain things that they normally package, I have to order the day before - no problem. It's proven easier than I l thought it would be. And, yes, Bea, it was you who initially inspired me to go down this route ....
      Ann.

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    3. My co-op has full support for bringing your own containers and even has bins at the wet bulk section for clean empties if people don't have/forgot their containers.

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  2. Wonderful post! My husband and I bought our first home, 800 square feet, no kids, one dog and one cat. We have been here for about 16 months and love it.
    Some friends, and most of our family, are shocked that we don't consider this our starter home. Since we don't plan on having children, we don't need more space--and we don't really want it either. I love to admit it...it is great how opposite my life is from my mother-in-law, who is convinced bigger is better, quantity over quality is the way to live, and how insane we are for only having one car :)
    We also find that our small house allows for more time outside, with our dog, in our garden, working on our rain collection (we live in Seattle after all!). None of our guest complain either than they sleep in our office/guest room--they are thankful we have opened our home to them--I assume those who complain about free hospitality wouldn't be considered friends anyhow!
    I work in Real Estate and I have a fascination with mid-century. Having a small house has made it possible to decorate the way I want--reusing/salvage as much as possible of course. If we had a larger house, we would be house poor, not able to keep up with maintenance, and not able to save for a rainy day or spend our disposable money in ways most important to us (quality food/groceries and travel).
    Great post Bea--keep them coming!

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  3. No! Do not move when the kids get sexually active! It is another benefit, Free contraception! :)

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    1. Anonymous2/17/2012

      Hee! Good point. :)

      JulieB

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    2. ;) the advantages of living small ARE really infinite;)

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    3. Anonymous2/24/2012

      @Inthesky - picture the word "YES!!" the size of football stadium!

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  4. Anonymous2/17/2012

    Thank you. You've inspired me to keep going on my reduction quest. Today, I felt my house was too big to get started. This just the optimistic view I needed to refocus my will.

    JulieB

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  5. I am a small house fiend myself. But without children, it's easy to do (my dogs don't much care). However, we found our limits when we moved sight-unseen into a Chicago apartment that was listed as being 1000 square feet and ended up being 450-500. My husband and I felt like there was nowhere I could go to study when he wanted to watch a movie, etc. We look for about 1000 in a home now.

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  6. i love it! small living spaces allow me to reduce the amount of stuff i purchase and to make sure i LOVE what i put in there. the 2 rooms in my 649sqft urban farm cottage are listed on airbnb.com for rent, while i've moved into my adjacent remodeled shop for a bit of privacy, which has three levels but is just 13' x 17'. that is an upgrade from the less than 300sqft studio i had downtown seattle for 6.5 years which i thought of as my greenhouse, since the windows on two side of the place looked out into the city and over the water to the islands. because of my expansive view, the place felt much larger than it was. all my friends loved it and i had quite a few guests and friends stay with me often. it's perception, not space, that is the limitation.

    thanks, bea. you have been a constant source of inspiration to me for over a year now since i discovered your blog.

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  7. heating and cleaning and etc a guest room for a couple guests a year...that really hit home. what a waste my guest room is. bah.

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  8. Anonymous2/17/2012

    We also live small. We have an 1100 sqft house with our five children and our dog. Like you said, we live very closely, and spend large amounts of our time together, versus being spread far apart. I find myself wishing our house was even smaller and we had more land instead. Our chickens could use some more farm friends :)

    Thank you for this blog, I really enjoy it!

    Linsey

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  9. Anonymous2/17/2012

    I love #10 - so hard to think about, but the day will be upon us all! I dream too of having a smaller house. My husband thinks I'm crazy...but I agree with the smaller the house, the less stuff you need, and the less time it takes for picking up and cleaning. I'm going to forward your post to my husband! Thanks for all your thought on small house living!
    Melissa N.

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  10. Great list, but you missed the biggest and most obvious benefit: Smaller Mortgage!

    I bought small back in the mid-1990's... my mortgage is only $450/month, and by making extra principal payments each month, it should be paid off completely next year.

    I've never figured out why people want to work so hard just so they can own huge houses, which they never get to spend any time in, because they're so busy working their rear ends off just to pay for the house! It makes no sense to me.

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    1. Thanks for making the point. I alwasy appreciate your input on the blog! I did not add mortgage to my list, because it did not apply to us... our old house and the current one were exactely the same price. We simply traded for a downtown within walking distance, which refers to #9. You are one smart (EcoCat)Lady to have bought small and at the right time!

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    2. Either smart or cheap... hard to tell sometimes! :~)

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    3. Jeannie2/17/2012

      lol

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  11. Lovely post- thanks!

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  12. Great post! This one really speaks to me because my husband and I are planning on buying our first home within the next year. We don't have kids, but plan on starting soon after we buy the house, so we are definitely looking for a family house. The thing is, my husband, my parents, his parents, and just about anyone else we talk to has a very different idea than I do about what a family house should be. I want between 1200 and 1600 square foot, but I am constantly told that I will regret it when I have kids. It does not seem to occur to anyone that wanting to learn to enjoy less is a worthy goal. Its great to hear a different viewpoint here, because I am so tired of how many people just follow along with convention and don't really think about it.

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    1. We raised two kids and uncountable pets in 1600 square feet. But on 2000 remote acres guests come to stay longer and there was always someone spending the night/weekend while they were growing up. Because my house is part of my business (on our ranch) there is no downsizing for us. But we planned our home carefully when we built it so the entire upstairs can be closed off keeping maintenance and expense to a minimum. Now the two of us live in about 900 square feet downstairs, which is more that adequate. So while it's important to think about space for kids, think about post-kids as well.

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    2. Everyone says you need a bigger house (I feel that everyone around me says that too), but it's just not true. We have two little kids who share a room and a third on the way. Our house is 1600sq ft. It is plenty of space -- we don't need monitors yet I don't feel even a little bit cramped. If our house wasn't on a noisy street we would probably never want to move!

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  13. Anonymous2/17/2012

    Yep, we also live in a small space: 800 SqFt, but with a yard at least twice that size. At maximum occupancy there were four humans, 3 dogs and 3 cats inside, and 2 chickens and 4 rabbits outside! Somehow it all has worked. Having one bathroom can be an issue to two teenagers, but you learn! Everyone has to pitch in. Living in a balmy climate helps, too, as we live outdoors as much as indoors. I suspect if one lived in a more extreme environment, one would need more "elbow room", but we've been very happy in our small space.

    Thanks so much for posting on this, as it's an important and timely notion. Well said.

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  14. Dana, my husband and I struggled with this as well. Try not to let your parents and in-laws weigh in your decision--easier said than done, right? :)

    I totally understand where you are coming from. My mother-in-law is currently grasping on to a 2300 sq foot house on half an acre (of heavily watered grass), and the house is falling apart. She is the only resident, and she won't take our advice (as most parents don't) to downsize.

    I also grew up in a family without a lot of money, so we had a 900 sq. foot house for a family of 5 until I was in middle-school. I would have gladly stayed there, as now my mother is in the larger house we purchased (and could not afford) when I was in high school(1600 sq ft.), cannot keep up with it financially or structurally--and is starting to hoard as well.
    Good luck fighting the good fight with your family--hopefully your husband jumps on board soon.

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    1. I could have written this myself! I love keeping my home small and simple for your reasons too!

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  15. Bea, this is probably one of my most favorite posts ever!! I love a small house and though I'm still in the process of using and having less(it's a process!) a small house just invites simple living.
    As always-thaks so much for sharing!

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  16. My husband and I downsized from a 1600 sf home in the city to a 460 sf cabin on an island. We sleep in a petite loft above our living space, which we share with our kitty. (That loft is inclusive of our 460 sf!) I love our home. With its open floor-plan, high ceilings, numerous windows, and custom shelving, the cabin feels much more spacious than it really is. Without interior walls, furniture is placed to create zones, and everything plays double-duty. In this small of a space, you really need to adhere to the motto, 'a place for everything and everything in its place'. In less than a minute, you can tour through our home's mudroom, walk-in closet, kitchen, pantry, dining room, office, living room, library and bedroom. We have a separate bathhouse that houses our toilet, sink, clawfoot tub and outdoor shower. We purchase a fair amount of our food directly from local farmers, and use an extensive rotating supply of glass jars to transport and house grocery and home goods. Yes, living this way takes time and thoughtful consideration. But by reducing our expenditures, space and stuff, we now have more time to live and work with intention and integrity. With nature at our doorstep, and a fabulous community of like-minded friends and family, I wouldn't change it for the world. I am truly blessed.

    Big thanks to Bea and her family, and all the rest of you who are thriving MORE with LESS.

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    1. Jeannie2/17/2012

      well said :)

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    2. Wrennerd2/18/2012

      Zanetha -- would love to see pics!

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    3. Anonymous2/18/2012

      Zanetha - could you please tell us 'your story'? with lots of pictures?

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    4. Yes, please share your story! (zerowastestory at gmail dot com). You make us dream!

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    5. Anonymous3/22/2012

      Start a blog? Please? :)

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    6. Anonymous10/03/2012

      We'd be very grateful if you would share a photo or two!

      Julie

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  17. We are currently living in a small space because of some reason like housekeeping efficiency,maintenance and parental awareness especially during nights.

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  18. Mrs. Scott2/17/2012

    Thanks, Bea for another positive and optimistic post. You do such an eloquent job of making zero waste so appealing! I live with my two boys and husband in an 1700 square foot home, dwarfed by many of the gigantic pretty Victorians homes nearby, but dreaming of smaller! While downsizing is unlikely, I realized reading this post that one of my stumbling blocks of getting rid of even more stuff is that we have loads of "convenient" storage. I need to get rid of those extra shelves and bins and such that make me lazy. I have made a bit of progress though. After purging my wardrobe a while ago, I moved the contents of our linen closet in my walk in closet. And I have several empty shelves in there....

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  19. Yes! We currently live in 900 square feet with a family of 3, one cat, and hopefully another baby on the way. We have the option to finish another 900 square feet in the basement as we need it for more children. We are remodeling now but it is so worth it to be close to downtown for us and we have a yard (which will hopefully have chickens soon). I totally love small houses. You should read Not So Big House, by Sarah Susanka - that is what totally converted us.

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  20. 450 square foot one-room yurt with 2 kids and a cat. (bath/shower/washer in a separate tiny building, and infinite outdoor space). If we were more organized than we are, we'd make even better use of the space. Even so, we love it.

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  21. Ottoline2/18/2012

    My husband and I and our six cats live in a 949 square foot home, which is actually twice the size of our last abode. Our home is beautifully decorated in the Edwardian style appropriate to its 1906 year of birth, and is cosy and comfortable. Yet guests often rudely comment on how "tiny" our house is, and pity us because we "must not have been able to afford" a larger house. We bought our house because it still has so many of the original features, including the beautiful woodwork and hardware, and the rest could be easily restored. We wouldn't trade it for any of the souless beige monstrosities that keep popping up to destroy the character of our older neighbourhood. Many of our acquaintances live in houses that are so large that they have had to hire help to clean and maintain them, which seems ridiculous to us. Our little house, far less expensive than those bland McMansions, also features a paid off mortgage. Other than having to move around the bed sideways, suffering the occasional stubbed toe, and having no extra bedroom to repair to in order to escape my husband's snoring, I also appreciate the fact that there is nowhere for goblins to hide. I recently spent an entire summer of sleepless nights and abject terror while housesitting for a friend with a home the size of a small castle.

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    1. Ha! I too hate the McMansions.

      OK... this is totally off topic and probably falls into the category of unwanted advice, so I apologize in advance. But if your husband really does have a snoring problem you might encourage him try out one of those mouth pieces that holds your lower jaw forward. I'm actually getting a "real" one from my dentist (supposed to be better for your teeth in the long run) but until it's done I've been using one I got off the internet and I have to say it's completely changed my life. I'm not pedaling products or anything here, it's just so amazing to FINALLY be able to sleep through the night that I sort of want to shout it from the rooftops! - The under 1000 square foot home rooftops that is.. :~)

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    2. Wrennerd2/18/2012

      "souless beige monstrosities" -- that is a perfect description!

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    3. @ecocatlady: I forwarded your comment to a friend, who is in desperate need to find a solution to her husband's snoring...

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  22. Here in England I don't think we have the same fixation on huge houses, partly because in the more populated areas there simply isn't the space. Of course that doesn't stop people *trying* to think palatial! My husband and I recently moved back to the UK after living in Japan for several years. Maybe it was the fact that we'd got used to living in two rooms with minimal stuff for so long (when we eventually moved to an apartment with a third room, we never used it!) or maybe its the outlandish price of real estate here, but we're living in a tiny two up, two down cottage and we love it. Sure, the kitchen is the size of a postage stamp, but its home. Enjoy what you have, I say!

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  23. Totally agree with this list. I've been progressively downsizing over the last 5 years and have moved from a house of 5000 sq feet into our tiny beach cottage of 750 sq feet. At first it was really hard letting go of the furniture, "treasures", and decor that I had accumulated over the years, but over time I did and it was really a relief not to be surrounded by so much stuff! My two teenaged daughters, 2 dogs and I love it! Like you, I would never contemplate moving to a large house again. Thank you for this great blog; it is a continuous sourse of inspiration!

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    1. Wow, that's some major downsizing! For me, it too was hard at first to let go of the moroccan decor and artifacts that I had so carefully collected over the years. I think I had the wrong assumption that letting go of stuff would make me empty inside, but it has been the complete opposite.

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  24. I've just finished packing and shipping 20 boxes of homeschooling supplies. 19 years of homeschooling 6 kids and every time a new year started I'd 'check the basement' for what we needed. Now they're all done and I have the basement back. But for what?

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  25. You are so inspiring to me! I would love to see how you organize other areas of your home.

    When I look at your spaces they make me feel free and happy, and when I look at mine... I still feel a little stressed. So much to do. I'm working on it, but it's tough to change so many year's worth of bad habits and it surely doesn't happen overnight.

    Oh... speaking of overnight, I had a dream about you and your family last night! (This is how much "zero waste" is clearly on my mind. LOL!) I dreamed that you became quite wealthy and built a very large home right on the beach and then missed your smaller house.
    Funny how our minds work.

    Thanks for sharing. :)

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    1. :)No... Thank YOU for sharing!

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  26. We are looking to downsize. I would love to just have the mortgage paid off and move ahead in our lives with more freedom and security for the future. It may be hard for having family come home, since we have 5 kids and some have their own kids, but we have thought of just getting a hotel room for those days when they come if necessary. There is never enough hot water in a home when guests come anyway, so maybe it can kill 2 birds with one stone. Also, we could go swimming at the hotel and babies could take naps there where it is quiet or people who want to get away from the noise could have a break. We are still figuring out just what we want before moving ahead.

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  27. I grew up in the UK so I still haven't quite adjusted to the idea of living in these giant US houses. Here in Chicago builders seem to squeeze the biggest house possible onto each lot, leaving a postage-stamp for a yard, and it always seems strange to me. When I eventually buy somewhere I'd love to have a smaller house and more garden so I can grow my own vegetables and have space to enjoy in the summer.

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  28. Great post! We (My husband, Son 24, Daughter 23 and I) live in a 900 sq. ft. home. We do have a 1/2 finished basement downstairs, also. When we bought this house 10 years ago, I was surprised, as others have said, that people thought it was our "starter" home. That stayed in the back of my mind for a few years, causing a sense of discontent and not being committed to this home or community. We got over that and made a decision that this is our home. We have done the structural things that needed to be done. Roof, garden beds, wood cook stove, and just yesterday, energy efficient windows. We are committed to this city, this neighborhood, and more importantly participating in this life in our home.

    Since reading your story, we have been looking at our stuff, each individual thing and asking if it is necessary. Many things have been gathered to donate and some have already been given away. What I have noticed most is the room that it creates in the house also creates room in me...I am less stressed and more creative. There seems to be a bigger change in us as we simplify our lives and work toward self sufficiency in the city. Your family is an inspiration, and as we find our way...I hope that we can also be!

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    1. That is so great that you were able to rise above the sense of discontent based on what other people said. We too had some friends say that our house was too small for us and that we would end up hating it... They could not have been more wrong. Our Zero Waste journey alone, started from downsizing.

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  29. Can't wait to down size as well. Our whole family is looking forward to it.

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  30. Camille2/18/2012

    I love your blog, Bea, but I have yet to comment. I am doing so now because the house-size issue has been on my mind a lot lately. Our first house was just under 1200 sq.ft., but within walking distance of a drugstore, park, school, bus-stop, and within comfortable biking distance to our city's vibrant downtown. We had one child and a dog, a decent-sized back yard, small attic, and storage bldg., but I always felt a little claustraphobic. Shortly after our second child was born, circumstances allowed us to move into my mother-in-law's home, which is 2,000 sq.ft., with a very large yard, 2-car garage and huge attic. MIL was living here by herself, and had it stuffed full of stuff! She moved without really emptying everything, and so we have been slowly trying to downsize ever since we moved. The irony of our situation (getting rid of stuff after locating to bigger space!) stares me in the face everyday. I have more space, but I have not found the satisfaction that I thought I would. I started reading your blog shortly after the move, and it continuously inspires me to reduce, reduce, reduce. It seems that every week we are taking a car load to the Goodwill. I have been scrutinizing the architecture of our current home and have come to the realization that the higher ceilings and extra space is really just wasted space, asking to be heated/cooled, and filled with unnecessary items. Thanks, Bea, for allowing me to realize that this is an ongoing process, that zero-waste is a goal/standard to always be reaching toward, and that it is totally up to me to find satisfaction with both my space and what I put in it.

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  31. this post struck a cascade of large and small memories...in France i lived in total duality circumstances..the tiny uptown apartment of my parents during school year and the very large mansion in the country for week-ends and vacations..mother never understood my adult taste for small and suburban.
    after buying a large victorian with remodeling appetite..we sold it and paid for a small older home in the US Midwest. still large for my husband and self at 1200 sq feet.
    enough space for a spare office/crafts/closet. and unused dining room/office.
    i do not miss any of the items which had to be sacrificed for the redux..and i am still unloading many extra clothing, dishes, craft items, lamps.
    yes the home is a hundred years old and paid for, so energy goes to insulation, maintenance and food production, easy clean-easy economy. and proud to be managing without a garage or car--we walk or bicycle to necessary places.
    bea, thank you for the motivation and reinforcement in living within ever smaller goals.merci!

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  32. Hi Bea,

    keep up the good work with your blog. It's a constant reminder and inspiration for me to live with less.

    Thanks!
    Mary

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  33. I saw Bea on The View and decided to try her zero waste approach. In Ottawa Ontario we already have a very sophisticated recycling program including a "green bin" pick up where all food waste, including meat and paper that doesn't go in the paper recycling gets picked up from the curb, composted and then is available to the public for pick up at parks through out the summer. So right now, our family of 6 (4 children) only produces less than a kitchen waste bag of garbage a week! Everything in there though is plastic bags from packaging! So I bought reusable cloth bags and started shopping at the Bulk Barn more which is actually more expensive than buying beans, flour, sugar ... from Costco. One my first trip they told me with disgust on their faces that you could not bring your own containers or bags that you MUST use their plastic bags because what I was doing was against Health and Safety regulations and completely unsanitary!! I am assuming this is not the case in the States then if Bea was able to do so and sells products to do this??? Any ideas on how to eliminate the plastic bags??

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    1. Hi Erica-

      I have had the same pushback in Washington State, where Whole Foods cites "Health Regulations", but cannot pin one down specifically (they accommodate Bea in Marin County, in California).

      I still am having a hard time finding a place to have my meat and cheese put into jars (our local co-op doesn't have a live meat or cheese counter, since it is small;but I can find anything else there zero waste)--but I had a breakthrough with our local fish market yesterday, who admired my plan and were happy to sell me fish!
      I stay away from the big box stores--they are usually less accommodating.

      Are there any other stores that sell bulk you can shop at? Such a bummer you are receiving such pushback. I would also write a letter to the store manager to ask for specifics to the rule--I had 3 guys at the Whole Foods in Seattle tell me it was because my containers cannot cross the counter into their area, but none could tell me specifics.

      Also, you might have better luck with finding supplies for your meat, poultry and cheese at a local farmer's market--where it is going to be more expensive than Costco, but you are buying from local farmers who offer far better choices than Costco, and all the other benefits of shopping local and supporting farmers directly (I used to shop at Costco too--it is the pride and joy of Seattle consumerism, next to Starbucks).

      Zero Waste is an ever-evolving path, don't get too discouraged. I first learned about it last year in the Sunset magazine article, and slowly have made progress. Yesterday was my first time buying seafood in my own containers, and hopefully tomorrow at the farmer's market, I will be able to get my first zero-waste packaging pork chops :)

      Keep it up--this blog is a great source of community and ideas!

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    2. The last time that I was in Bulk Barn, I saw them refilling some of the candy. They were emptying out bags that weren't any bigger than what you would buy at Costco or even Loblaws. It made me wonder if it really does reduce waste to buy there, especially if it's a product you'd be willing to buy in larger quantities yourself.

      Maybe there are other, better, sources of bulk food in your area? I think it's something worth exploring. I don't live in Canada right now, otherwise I'd trade notes with you!

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    3. I would talk to the manager at the Whole Foods because other locations do it like ones in Vancouver, BC.

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    4. Renee CA2/18/2012

      Abby - I noticed this at Winco (central California) as well, and wonder how much waste is really saved. The "bulk" stuff came in boxes about one foot square, packed in a large plastic bag. Maybe the beans and flour come in large bags but not nuts, candy, dried fruit, etc.

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    5. I live in Ottawa too and I've been bringing my own bags to Bulk Barn, and they don't seem to care. I never asked if I could use them, I just started to and no one has said anything. I usually go to the one at Carlingwood. I haven't tried to use my own containers yet. I do have some plastic bags that I keep using and washing for things like flour and sugar.

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    6. -I was recently turned down at a store where I have been refilling my jars for the past 3 years. The staff said: "it's against health and safety regulations". She eventually asked her manager and got my jar filled. But a comment like this would deter a first timer! It takes guts to do the uncoventional, but please do not give up, try another store, or even another day!

      -I find it easier not to ask for permission to use cloth bags or jars. For example, when facing new staff at the fish counter, I'll say: "four calamari steaks please, in here please" as I hand out my jar, looking down at the calamari steaks, aloof. (looking at the staff for approval, will make them doubt. I act as if jars were common practice (as if I had shopped this way my whole life).

      -I have spent most of my Green Awards prize money to build a bulk app! we are still working on it, but I hope that it will help us all find bulk locations!

      Delete
    7. Such a good idea... thanks, Bea... I'm going to try that this week when buying my salmon.
      ~Corinna

      Delete
  34. My fiance and I are currently living in a huge house. We have 4 roommates, who each have their own room, and a very large backyard by suburban Southern California standards. That being said, half of the space in the house isn't being used! Our bedroom is 300 sq. ft. We have an attached bathroom, and a walk-in closet. This room functions as our bedroom, living room, office, craft room, houses 6 - 10 guinea pigs at a time (we foster guinea pigs), and a (small) dog. The downstairs living room, foyer/den, and back yard are almost never used (except by the dogs - one of the other roommates has a small one as well). Now we are starting to garden one half of the yard, but even the dining room was never used until recently (again, by us). The garage is 100% storage space. All of this drives me nuts! The kitchen is the only room downstairs that gets any regular use! We have all of this extra, wasted space in the house and yet Sean and I feel like we're falling over each other every time we move. We know that we want something a /little/ bigger than we have now, but we certainly don't want a 2000 sq. ft. house. We want something that we can grow a family in, but that won't be overwhelming once the kids are grown up and on their own. We care more about the backyard space for the dog and the garden than we do about having an office room, a craft room, and a man cave, and a living room all in separate rooms of the house. I guess that's probably why, even though we feel a little cramped, we still haven't spread out and conquered the rest of the house...

    ReplyDelete
  35. Wrennerd2/18/2012

    I was just reminded of one of my favorite perks of small house living. In my 1,324 sq ft home (admittedly on the large side of small), I just vacuumed the whole house without ever having to reposition the plug!

    P.S. Is anyone else finding the new captchas almost impossible to interpret? I've had to re-enter things multiple times to get them right... :(

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, they make me crazy.

      Delete
    2. YES... I often refrain from commenting on blogger blogs now just b/c I don't have time to re-enter the captchas... so annoying!

      Delete
  36. Anonymous2/18/2012

    I like the idea of a small house in theory but it becomes difficult in practice, especially when your kids get older. My son is a teenager and I think he feels awkward having his friends over - his room is small and our living room becomes the room everyone has to gather in, not the best for teen privacy. He sees his friends in bigger, better houses and is very status conscious. That is just where our society is and although it may be a "teachable moment," I grew up in a poor neighborhood and was equally embarrassed by the way we lived and so can relate to some of his feelings. And don't get me started on one bathroom!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
  37. Renee CA2/18/2012

    I can get very claustrophobic and especially dislike narrow hallways. I love space around me and the ability to have people over and not feel cramped. Being married to a custom home builder (now retired) I have lived in homes from 1100 to 3000 sq ft. With 3 children, I was most comfortable at 1800 to 2000 sq ft with an indoor laundry and an extra room for projects or getting away from it all.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. camille2/19/2012

      I also have a tendency towards claustrophobia, and my 1200 sq.ft. house sometimes gave me that feeling, especially the teeny bathroom, and the fact that I had to turn and walk sideways to get from my bed to my closet! I am also in agreement that a laundry room is important- I now have a laundry closet, whereas my smaller house actually had a small room. But now that I have a 2000 sq.ft. house, I feel that I simultaneously have too much and too little space. I think design matters more to me than square footage. If a space is easily navigable and has a good flow, I can manage better than when I feel confined.

      Delete
  38. Rachel2/18/2012

    Bea, this is an unbelievably timely post. I got divorced last year and since then have shared the 2500 sq ft marital home with just my 3-year-old daughter. Although technically I can afford to continue living here, I keep asking myself "why"? Huge areas of the home are seldom used and it's a trek to get from the kitchen up to my daughter's room, if she calls for me while I'm doing the dishes. Friends and family keep telling me I will appreciate the space when my daughter is older, but I simply can't justify living this lifestyle in the hope that someday it will be useful. Just this morning I looked at a 1200 sq ft home for sale and was in love. Your post was just the kick in the pants I needed to move forward on reshaping my life so that it aligns with my values.

    ReplyDelete
  39. We started out our marriage in a beautiful 12 X 60 mobile home, in a park on a lake. We had an RV lot that was just perfect. We only sold it, because we wanted to have a child, and everyone said we "needed" more space if we wanted to have kids. What a joke! We now have a 1100 square foot house and don't use the majority of it. Our "summer home," a 29-foot sailboat, is much more appropriate for our family, AND faster to clean.

    ReplyDelete
  40. Anonymous2/19/2012

    I am wondering how small is small? Our family of three lives in a 650 square foot house (not counting detached single garage) and a 50 square foot yard. We can't have more than 2 people over for dinner at a time because we don't have room for a dining room table. And the bumping into each other all the time drives me crazy! It is basically impossible for two people to walk into the bathroom (making bathing a toddler a little tricky).

    The one thing it has taught me though is that I don't need much more space. 1200 square feet would be a dream. Also, the great benefit is that it makes an easy excuse to refuse tons of toys that people are always trying to buy for my toddler!

    ReplyDelete
  41. We recently moved from an 1100 sq ft home to 800 sq ft. We love it for many of the reasons you describe. Particularly less cleaning and better family bonding. My son is 2 so it's nice to always have him within ear shot.

    Another bonus: we've never owned a baby monitor. Even in our old home he was always close enough for us to hear him.

    ReplyDelete
  42. I so can't wait until our house sells. My walk out basement (family room) is pretty empty as it is now. I gave the sofa and empty bookcases away :) Decluttering has it pluses. As for heating we can just use the wood fireplace or I just shut the vents if my son isn't there. The grandkids love it as a play room when it is to cold to play on the deck. So, my hubby and I basically live upstairs... Anyone want to buy a mountain chalet? Ha!

    ReplyDelete
  43. Anonymous2/19/2012

    I have been so inspired by your blog and am starting to rid my life of plastic and waste. I would love to know where to get antique French kitchen towels. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ottoline2/21/2012

      Hello Anonymous,

      You might try Maison Douce here in the Portland area for antique French tea towels:
      http://isabellang.blogspot.com/

      Delete
    2. I made mine from an old sheet.

      Delete
    3. Anonymous2/21/2012

      Thanks for the info- I'm getting rid of paper towels and I thought it would be a good place to re-use (antique!) AND I just took my own re-usable cloth bags to Publix for my produce, and they didn't bat an eye. Thanks for so much good advice, Bea.

      Delete
  44. Favorite post ever!!! I love love love small homes and cottages. Our house is bigger than i would like, but it is the old farmhouse on our family farm. I guess that it's better to "recycle" the rundown old house than to rebuild a new smaller cottage. With just over 2000 square feet it's still not huge.

    ReplyDelete
  45. Anonymous2/20/2012

    Bea, you discuss about how you live close to amenities that are within walking distance. Could you please share us your walkscore on walkscore.com? It gives a grade as to how walkable a neighborhood is. I use it to find amenities near me when I travel. I have no vested interest in walkscore.com. My company put me up in a hotel in downtown San Francisco recently and it had a walkscore of 98 out of 100, meaning I can walk to almost everything. Back home in a suburb in Wichita, KS, it's 14, which is very car dependant.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Out of curiosity, I tried walkscore.com and my score is 42. I am not in walking distance of anything, except a park, unless you plan on walking for 40+ min - and that include my kids' public school. I would say, I am in biking distance of everything, but definitely not walking.

      Delete
    2. We score a 95. Our previous location is a 48. I did not know about that site and will definitely use it again, especially for trip planning! Thanks for the tip!

      Delete
  46. Wow what a post i am so impressed here can you more prefer us i will back to you soon as soon possible and also i have some information for you just click here Stair Chair Lift. I think you will inspire here.
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    Stair Chair Lift

    ReplyDelete
  47. When I divorced I moved from 2500 sq. ft to 1500sq. ft. with three small kids. A few years later I added one new husband and another child. We always planned to move to a bigger home. We even bought a piece of property to build a 4000 sq. ft. house and then the mortgage crisis hit and my husband was out of a job. We have stayed in our small house and now have two kids in college. It was difficult at times during the teen years, but only for me ( I wanted some a space of my own.) My kids loved it. It turns out teens love to know what everyone in the house is doing at the same time. Our house became the "hang out" house even though it was the smallest one of all their friends.
    Now that we have two less kids in the house I am so happy we do not have a lot of empty, unused space. I make trips to Goodwill often because there isn't any room for a lot of junk in our home. We use what we have. I also saved money by getting rid of my cleaning lady, as it takes me no time at all to clean. I love the intimacy our smaller home has brought to our family and I can't imagine living in a home where I have to use an intercom to talk to my kids. Here's to small home living!

    ReplyDelete
  48. Dasher2/20/2012

    I'm another one who lives in a small house and LOVES it! I just had a baby over Christmas and it's staggering how many people ask when/where we will be moving. We have no intention of moving- my husband and I can both walk/ride to work, the house can be cleaned in a flash, we are surrounded by cafés, public pool, harbour, galleries, museums, train station, bus etc, and our darling daughter will have three parks to choose from within a couple of minutes walk. Oh and considering the Sydney housing market we are very lucky with our smaller mortgage! It's also been great to make us pause before accepting or buying that extra toy etc. Our backyard is also small but again it is highly functional and easy to keep maintained. We just love it!

    ReplyDelete
  49. Hi Bea,

    What a lovely post you have here. Our family have been living in Beijing for 12 years now. We bought our first apartment in Beijing which was of 110m square (330 feet), then as we have our third kid we move to our current 200m square (670 feet). We changed the layout of our current apartment so that all the bathroom are outside of the rooms (one of them was ensuite). We converted the master bedroom as guest-room/study/office/kids playroom. The girls shared the second biggest room with balcony that can also be accessed from the smallest room (the boy's). We took the last room as our bedroom and put a mattress, two side lamps and a beautiful old chinese basin holder that we use as cloth hanger. Our friends were surprise with our bedroom, as well as how tidy the kids room are. All rooms got its build in wardrobe for easy sell later. They still have quite some toys (will be donated by this spring) that we can fit into the wardrobe.

    We are having our house in Bali built now. On drawing the are should be of 208m square (680 feet) including a terrace on the third floor. everyone was surprise when we decided not to have ensuite and keep the bedrooms small. They don't seem to understand why after all these years abroad we can't seem to be able to afford a bigger house.... until we start talking about the cost of keeping a big house particularly electricty cost of the airconditioner to keep the house cool.

    When we move to Bali we really like to idea of seeing our kids stay outdoor in the garden/terrase or get involved in the kitchen, using their room just to sleep. We believe that we should take maximum benefit of the nice weather in Bali, strictly no TV in the bedroom.

    Our challenge now is keeping our moving container small, meaning preparing to say goodbye to some of the nice furniture that we have here. I have already have in mind the 4 pieces I would like to keep and then will sell, donate the rest of them. Will keep you posted on our final tally of shipped container.

    ReplyDelete
  50. Ahh I thought my calculation was wrong, I just double cheched, 110sqm = 1100sq feet, 200 sq m = 2152 sq feet, 208sqm is around 2200 sqf of which 38sqm (409sqf) is terasse. Those numbers sound right.... and sound big too. hemmmm.....

    Sorry all, did not realised conversion of lenth is not the same as square.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous2/21/2012

      Ratna, you make an interesting point: I, too, like the idea of children using their bedrooms for sleeping and not a play space; because of this, our two kids never considered the shared 10x!0 ft room too small. I also believe it created a calming mood, and encouraged the two to quietly talk at nights: no TV, no music, no computers. To this day, the bedrooms are for quiet conversation, reading, resting, sleeping.
      Your home in Bali sounds wonderful

      Delete
    2. WIth hindsight, I agree with this - were I to do it again, a shared bedroom and a shared playroom would be the way to go with my 3 girls, despite big age differences (7 and 5 years).
      After our eldest moved out (the two eldest did share a room for a few years) and we moved to a smaller house, the two younger ones shared our attic space, one large room. They were one at either end with a common area in the middle with seating, PC, books etc. (they were 10 and 15 when we moved here). Although the whole space is about 55square metres, the roof goes down to a height of only one foot and there are heavy beams, so a lot less than 55 is actually usable space. It worked well. Now it's just the youngest and I never go up there!
      Our whole house is about 7x9m and we mostly live on the middle floor which is a living room/kitchen, bedroom and bathroom. The lowest level has one room apart from the entrance/stairs and a showerroom with laundry tower. The rest is a "basement" room (natural stone/earth floor) and a tiny room where our gas heating is and we keep sports gear, shoes and luggage there.
      I estimate our actual living space to be about 1000 square feet. We have plenty of room!

      Delete
  51. Anonymous2/20/2012

    Hi Bea,

    I just wanted to let you know that you have a new fan out here in cyberland. I have been so inspired by your blog!

    All the best,

    Liz

    ReplyDelete
  52. Anonymous2/20/2012

    We live in about 1500 square feet, which is perhaps not *small*, but is comfortable for our family of five. The children share rooms, plus I work out of our home part-time. The best part about our house though, is the lack of storage space. Aside from a tiny attic storage area, that's it; one of the bedrooms doesn't even have a closet. Because we have little space to store extra stuff, we are very good at donating or loaning out unneeded items, or simply not acquiring them in the first place.

    ReplyDelete
  53. Anonymous2/21/2012

    Bea,

    I have been following your blog for a few months now and find it very thought provoking. I am only writing to say that I am thankful that you and your family share this experience with me (as thousands of others) and to encourage you to keep doing it, notwithstanding mean and close minded "commentators".

    Bon courage!

    ReplyDelete
  54. Anonymous2/21/2012

    I love this blog. Thought I would attach a link to a YouTube video that supports your way of life. The title is There's No Tomorrow.

    PJ

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VOMWzjrRiBg

    ReplyDelete
  55. Anonymous2/21/2012

    Forum link (above) doesn't seem to work. Those interested, try this:
    http://forum.994912.n3.nabble.com/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks and sorry for the inconvenience... we're remodeling...

      Delete
  56. Anonymous2/21/2012

    Bea - I am a long time fan - well, since the TODAY showed featured you and your family. I have found many struggles along my path to a zero waste home, and I am wondering if you would share how you did get everyone on board, from your husband and your kids. I know you've spoken in the past here and there, but I guess I am looking for what words and actions really did make an impression. My kids are 5 and 3, and my 5 year old is asking for video games (which we don't have but I think he's getting this idea from school) and he really wonders why he can't buy a few books at the school book fair. My husband really likes the idea of zero waste and tells me he doesn't bring in much, but this is from a guy who brings freebies and carry-out containers into our home all the time. A few years ago, we moved from a 1000 sq feet to 3000 sq feet, and I really dislike the large rooms, and all the extra space. As I haven't filled the rooms up, it feels very bare. I would love my husband to entertain the idea of a smaller home (maybe not the 1000 sq feet again) but he doesn't feel there is value in moving to a smaller home. (I know it sounds more like I need a family therapist : ),...) Anyways, if you could share a bit more tidbits about how everyone got on board...and was it your idea to move to a smaller home and downsize or was it an economic downfall? Just wondering how I can get my husband and kids more serious about zero waste. Thanks!! Melissa N.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous2/22/2012

      Hi Bea, I am admiring the bedding in the photo. I would like something similar for my kids' beds. Would you share the details? Thanks so much!

      Delete
    2. Anonymous3/13/2012

      Yes! Where did you buy the bedding? You should do a post: zero waste bedroom. I think you have done a post on every other room :)

      Delete
  57. 12 great reasons for a small house... I especially love the last one. Since moving all of my stuff out of my parent's house and into my university room, I'm really starting to appreciate needing less stuff to fill a bunch of unnecessary space.

    ReplyDelete
  58. Hey Bea,
    I couldn't find the junkmail post and I am on a time frame right now. One of my coworkers told me about this app, I guess her daughter stopped receiveing the majority of their junkmail after using this app.

    I love your blog, have a nice day!

    https://www.paperkarma.com/

    ReplyDelete
  59. Anonymous2/22/2012

    I love your blog. I love your pictures of Zizou. I noticed you tweeted about feeding him cauliflower soup, and can't reply in that medium. Cauliflower is good for dogs, but I want to remind your readers to be careful feeding human food to dogs as there are surprising toxic properties for dogs in many common foods including blood poisoning properties in onion and garlic. Check out the lists at the ASPCA and the humane society. I was surprised by grapes/raisins, avocado, and some nuts.
    http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/poison-control/people-foods.aspx
    http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/resources/tips/foods_poisonous_to_pets.html

    ReplyDelete
  60. Anonymous2/24/2012

    Hi Bea, I am trying to convince my husband to buy a small house. Question is how small is your small house? Thanks, Tanja

    ReplyDelete
  61. I love this list!
    We recently (somewhat involuntarily) downsized from a 1300 square foot house with a basement, yard, and shed to a 900 square foot condo with no large storage space or yard. I somehow feel like my family (2 adults, 1 toddler, 2 cats, 1 dog) has more room here! We got rid of a bunch of stuff, and are slowly weeding out more. But without all the extra "space", we have nowhere to cram a bunch of stuff we don't want or need, which frees up time, money, and head space. :)

    ReplyDelete
  62. I love living in a small space. Now, if only my husband weren't addicted to gigantic furniture. Sigh.

    ReplyDelete
  63. Anonymous3/23/2012

    We live in a small "semi" in Sydney, Australia, and we love it for all of the reasons you articulated so well. The house is very "efficient". We had house-sitters recently and they said they loved that it was uncluttered and so easy to live in.

    ReplyDelete
  64. Your simple lifestyle has inspired me to live more simply than I already have been. Thirty-two years ago, my exemplary grandmother, honored as Mother-of-the-Year for the state of VA in 1966, taught me to keep my home clean using only natural products, among many other housekeeping and home-making skills. She also taught me how to display a servant's heart, be a good wife and mother, as well as a gracious, hospitable lady. All my married life I've attempted to achieve and maintain a healthy, wise balance on creating beauty in my home. Your sensible, caring approach to the art of domestic engineering makes my spirit soar with the possibility of lightening the burden of my own domestic load. The pristine conditions of your home are like a breath of fresh VA mountain air!

    I am disturbed by your careless remark concerning your sons' expected promiscuous sexual activity. For one to engage in sexual activity when not ready is irresponsible, selfish and hurtful. It is definitely not a casual, recreational activity. For someone so adamantly against throwing things carelessly away, the possibility of babies being produced by immature individuals only to be thrown away to rot is nothing to sneeze at!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, I agree about being disturbed by the sex comment. Well said, F4C.

      Delete
  65. Thank you for your blog. I look forward to following you. As I still have lots of questions of how you live with so little waste in a year.
    Me and my husband live in a small 1500 sq. ft. home and are expecting our 3rd child. I´ve been busy getting my master´s degree and now having a career on top of being pregnant and have lost sight of how important living a more sustainable life is to me. I use to be diligent of recycling, using our push mower in stead of our gas mower, using cloth instead of disposable diapers and napkins, repairing instead of throwing away clothing, drying clothes out on the clothes line instead of the dryer and growing my own food.

    Now I use too many disposable cups and things, I eat out too much, I use disposable diapers, I have been throwing away my recycling all just because I am so tired with a family and a full time job that keeping up with all the STUFF we have acquired is overwhelming.

    Soon I will be quitting my job and staying home with my boys and this new baby. I hope to get the energy back to declutter my home and become proud of my home again.

    Thank you for reminding me of that.

    ReplyDelete
  66. I'm so glad that I randomly bought April's 2012 Family Circle Magazine. I read the snippet and was intrigued from the headline. I'm a housewife of 4 children who is venturing into a greener more sustainable lifestyle. We live in a Vintage 1946 home which is 998 sq feet. I recently started to blog also and find your's inspirational. Here's to you and all that you do. Thanks for the insight and information.

    ReplyDelete
  67. Thank you, Bea... one of your best posts yet!
    ~Corinna

    ReplyDelete
  68. Priroda5/21/2012

    Loved your post… I have a somewhat different take on all this. I originally come from Sarajevo, Bosnia (although I’ve been living in England for 21 years) where nearly everyone lives in a small space. When I was little we lived in 300 square ft square and then moved to 800 square feet which felt like a palace to me and my brother! In Bosnia for most people rooms are multi-purpose – during the day it’s a playroom or a living room / dining room and then it becomes a bedroom at night. Everyone has these cool sofa beds which are basically really comfy folding mattresses – they do look like normal sofas or couches but they are so comfy to sleep on (as sit on during the day). People reuse and recycle routinely Rooms are shared, zoned – it’s just amazing. Having said all that the diaspora (those living abroad because of the war) returning back by and large are now building massive houses that are empty 11 months of the year… During the war people left homes with nothing and that proved what I always knew to be true – stuff is totally and completely unimportant. You may think your stuff is important but truly if a tornado, flood, earthquake or fire came along you’d only save so much – the rest is just an illusion. It’s not just in Bosnia tha that people live in small spaces…. I’ve travelled to India and seen how ordinary Indians live – again it’s all shared, multifunctional, multiuse (for most people for of course there are the rich everywhere).
    My family of four, including two children aged nine and four, lives in 650-700 square feet apartment in one of the richest villages in England. We are surrounded by massive houses. I just love our village: it’s so green, we’re 20 mins from Central London, shops, pubs, park, school are all 5 minutes walk, we have amazing view and fantastic neighbours but I did have to explain myself to other mums when we started having playdates, LOL. I think it’s funny because we have a two bed home which is lovely and my husband is home each night to spend time with his children whilst people who ask me to ‘explain this lifestyle’ live in massive homes but fathers don’t see their kids. Each to their own I keep saying… I think for all of us who posted here it does take courage, personal integrity to live like we do because our society on this beautiful planet thinks that more means happiness and it doesn’t!
    You would love The Tiny House People documentary if you’ve not seen it already http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lDcVrVA4bSQ. Also for anyone who wants to simplify try http://www.simplelivingforum.net/ and also Your Money or Your Life http://www.financialintegrity.org/index.php?title=Main_Page

    ReplyDelete
  69. I don’t exactly know what happened, but it seems like moving into your new smaller house wasn’t too difficult. Sharing ways on how it improved your life will definitely help make people look at household matters in a positive light. And it is a good thing that you are making the most of what you have. 

    Rebecca Stratton

    ReplyDelete
  70. Thanks for great information you write it very clean. I am very lucky to get this tips from you.

    Cold Storage Vancouver

    ReplyDelete
  71. Everything is cool and nicely said. I need to implement this to my new eastwood city parkview condo. :)

    ReplyDelete
  72. I learned a lot with your post. There are a lot of things should consider when your going to live in a big or small house . I will apply this things when I got married and purchase a small house. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  73. This is really a fantastic blog, could you be interested in going through an interview concerning just how you made it?

    ReplyDelete
  74. Hi guys

    This is the best blog which ever i have seen related to keep my home,

    Thanks for blogging!!
    Keep blogging..,

    ReplyDelete
  75. Anonymous12/30/2012

    HOW HE HELPED MY MARRIAGE
    After 31 years of marriage, my ex-husband, left me for a women he met in a game playing chat room. They played spades together for about a year and started chatting through instant messages. Every time I would come in and ask him when he was going to come downstairs and come to bed he would hold papers in front of the screen or hit a button to wipe the screen clean. I thought it was porn, I knew he had copied plenty of photos off, so I didn't think much until I found the plane tickets and intercepted calls from down south. He gave me some dumb story, as he traveled for his business and had clients he met different places. Our love life was better during the. His time, than the previous few years and we had just purchase a home for the first time in our married life had me quit my job to help run his home office, only I was not allowed access to the computer as I would mess his files up. I wish this site were available to me three years ago. We are now divorce, not because of me or the gal down south, when she found out he was married she dumped him. He wanted to be alone, so he said, we had been together for a total of 35 years and he wanted to be alone. It took him over two years to divorce me, but only one month to move in with the harlot he lives with now. We have been divorce only a little over four months, he has gone through bankruptcy, two jobs and now is living off his new love in another state. He has no contact with me, including failing to pay his maintenance, or with his three children.i meet DR. OMO alteroffiretemple@gmail.com on internet and he told me what to do to make him love me more than any other thing so i did after that my husband called me and started to delete picture from his Email i was so surprise that day and he promise not to cheat on me again i am so happy for the work of DR. OMO alteroffiretemple@gmail.com and i will stop to share his testimony.

    ReplyDelete
  76. Anonymous12/30/2012

    HOW HE HELPED MY MARRIAGE
    After 31 years of marriage, my ex-husband, left me for a women he met in a game playing chat room. They played spades together for about a year and started chatting through instant messages. Every time I would come in and ask him when he was going to come downstairs and come to bed he would hold papers in front of the screen or hit a button to wipe the screen clean. I thought it was porn, I knew he had copied plenty of photos off, so I didn't think much until I found the plane tickets and intercepted calls from down south. He gave me some dumb story, as he traveled for his business and had clients he met different places. Our love life was better during the. His time, than the previous few years and we had just purchase a home for the first time in our married life had me quit my job to help run his home office, only I was not allowed access to the computer as I would mess his files up. I wish this site were available to me three years ago. We are now divorce, not because of me or the gal down south, when she found out he was married she dumped him. He wanted to be alone, so he said, we had been together for a total of 35 years and he wanted to be alone. It took him over two years to divorce me, but only one month to move in with the harlot he lives with now. We have been divorce only a little over four months, he has gone through bankruptcy, two jobs and now is living off his new love in another state. He has no contact with me, including failing to pay his maintenance, or with his three children.i meet DR. OMO alteroffiretemple@gmail.com on internet and he told me what to do to make him love me more than any other thing so i did after that my husband called me and started to delete picture from his Email i was so surprise that day and he promise not to cheat on me again i am so happy for the work of DR. OMO alteroffiretemple@gmail.com and i will stop to share his testimony.

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